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"cured" Squid?


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#1 Samantha

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 06:54 PM

Hi,

Ich frage mich schon lange, was "Cured Squid" eigentlich ist, ich seh das taeglich in den Wetmarkets der Chinesen, bislang konnte mir aber keiner wirklich erklaeren, wozu das (was eigentlich?) gemacht wird und wie man daraus Tintenfischessen zaubert.

Auch die getrockneten Tintenfische geben mir Raetsel auf, wie verarbeitet man die denn weiter, kann man das Endprodukt mit frischem Tintenfisch vergleichen oder schmeckt das ganz anders?

Samantha
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#2 glen

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 09:04 PM

hi samantha. an english translation would be very welcome! :woot:
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#3 Samantha

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 09:54 AM

Oh, :woot: Sorry, sometimes I forget about writing in a foreign language. Sorry again.

In the chinese Wet markets I often can see some squid, labeled as "Cured" Squid, looks not too beautiful, thick, big, yellow/brown coloured whole Squid. I tried to figure out, what to do with it, but failed. I do not even know, how they produce that kind of Squid. Maybe some kind of preservation? Any ideas? How to use it, is it even worth it?

Same question about the dried, flat whole squid, what to do with that? Soak in water or not, for how long, is it worth the procedure???

Many thanks for explanation and ideas :woot:

Samantha
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#4 bpm2000

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 03:41 AM

Oh, :woot: Sorry, sometimes I forget about writing in a foreign language. Sorry again.

In the chinese Wet markets I often can see some squid, labeled as "Cured" Squid, looks not too beautiful, thick, big, yellow/brown coloured whole Squid. I tried to figure out, what to do with it, but failed. I do not even know, how they produce that kind of Squid. Maybe some kind of preservation? Any ideas? How to use it, is it even worth it?

Same question about the dried, flat whole squid, what to do with that? Soak in water or not, for how long, is it worth the procedure???

Many thanks for explanation and ideas :ink

Samantha


I know this topic is a bit old but since nobody replied I can give you something of an answer. The whole, flat dried squid in Asia is often roasted over some kind of heat until the squid becomes more pliable/edible and then the squid is just eaten as is for a snack. The body portion tears into nice strips and you just eat the legs. A bit chewy but well, its squid.

No clue about the cured stuff.
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#5 glen

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 08:39 PM

thanks for the response bpm,

cheers, glen :woot:
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#6 sam_k

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 01:12 PM

I know this topic is a bit old but since nobody replied I can give you something of an answer. The whole, flat dried squid in Asia is often roasted over some kind of heat until the squid becomes more pliable/edible and then the squid is just eaten as is for a snack. The body portion tears into nice strips and you just eat the legs. A bit chewy but well, its squid.

No clue about the cured stuff.



As a young lad I have often frequented a roadside stall in Malaysia where the squid seller would roast his dried squids over a low charcoal fire and then pound the result on a wooden block to tenderise. I then tear strips off my purchase and eat after dipping in a sweet chilli sauce (supplied )......yes, chewy and very yummy.

As to Samantha's posting:

No, don't just soak the dried squid in water. It will never re-constitute to its original size (i.e. fatten up ). It is done by soaking in a liquid called " karn suey " ( in Cantonese ), a kind of potash water obtainable in provision shops. This way, it brings back the "springiness" / slightly crunchy texture in eating. As for reciepes, ask locally.

I live in London, U.K. now and was told that " lyle water " sold in bottles in supermarkets would do the same but have not tried. Others have suggested bi-carbonate of soda. Perhaps one day I'll try. If someone has attempted, I would like to know the "right" concentration as I would not like to spoil the dried squid. They are expensive in London !

A posting here would be great.
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