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Artificial Jigs


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#1 flounderpirate

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 09:04 AM

Argh, Ahoy mateys.

This be a question about artificial jigs.

Whenever I have caught squid it has been on a single slowly sinking jig. But sometimes there is a current and the jig doesn't sink very quickly. Is it a good idea to tie the jig from a dropper line a metre above a terminal sinker and simply drop the whole lot below the boat? Can I tie two jigs on separate droppers from the same mainline?

Has anybody had success using this method?
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Fresh air, tight lines, scales, slime and fins, 'tis the salty sea dog life for me. Arrrgh!

#2 glen

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 10:19 PM

I have seen that working for people at Mornington Pier. So should work fine :)
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#3 Jazman

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 09:19 AM

Ahoy Mike, I have used that method while drifting in the rowboat and it works well. Another option would be to get some of the newer style of jigs which have a hole in the lead keel, that you can add extra weight to eg/ lead wire etc. Or I guess you could drill a hole in the keel of one of your existing jigs!

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#4 flounderpirate

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 10:43 AM

Ahoy Jazman my mate!

That is a great idea, I will drill little holes and use wire to hang added weight.
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Fresh air, tight lines, scales, slime and fins, 'tis the salty sea dog life for me. Arrrgh!

#5 Jazman

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 11:15 AM

I have done a little more research, it seems that there are commercially available luminous 'screw in' weights that you can add to jigs which have a hole in the keel......I think a nut and bolt of the right diameter would probably do the same job.

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http://jtackle.info/...us_Weight.shtml
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#6 Jazman

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 11:21 AM

That jtackle site has a wealth of information about adding/removing weight from squid jigs!

Drilling the keel:
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http://jtackle.info/...Jig_Drill.shtml


Adding lead wire to the keel:
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http://jtackle.info/...ht_Adding.shtml
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#7 flounderpirate

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 03:45 PM

Wow Jazman!

Thay Have thought of everything!

But given that I will realize that the jig needs more weight when I am out on the water, I won't want to fiddle around adding wire on the keel then. The bolt and nut idea are good but you are right, I wouldn't pay for it, just use one from the tool box.

Thanks Jazman
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Fresh air, tight lines, scales, slime and fins, 'tis the salty sea dog life for me. Arrrgh!

#8 egi zed

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 10:49 PM

The Daiwa ones that Jazman posted in his first reply come with the weight bolts. For Yamashita and home drilled ones you'll need the tool box :)
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