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Lighting For Squid (and Other Things...)


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#1 TentacleWrestler

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 10:50 AM

DPohlson recently wrote a reply to one of my earlier postings (thank you!).

DP wrote;

Tryin to get a light system together. Squid fishing is a complete mystery to me, but I know they like light. figured a couple of water-proof lamps suspended from my john boat on a calm night at the end of May might do it.

I got glow in the dark Sibiki rigs and a few other LED gizmos, but haven't used them yet. Can anybody give a good location say between Boston and Plymouth. Please no spot burning.

Do they like structure? Where are they going? Why? I'm talking around here in New England.

cheers,
-DP

DP,

Lighting is important, but don't go crazy with it! Last year, I had someone ask me how much light to use, and I stated that since the squid appear to run during their mating season (late April through mid May - sometimes longer depending) they tend to move around the full moon. Ideal lighting usually consists of nothing more than a dim lantern. Too much light can spook them. I shy away from the "float lights." Try to mimic the light of a full moon. The one thing I've come to notice, is that the squid may not be attracted to the light, but the baitfish and krill are! These are the things the squid feed on, so anything that brings the food in, usually brings the squid right behind them!

The jigs don't have to glow or contain LED's, but with the New England water being turbulent at times, anything that helps increase visibility can't hurt.

About your question about location -

There are several places to try. Some people enjoy fishing in the Boston area. I don't know of a bunch of places, but one of my coworkers told me about a place in the Quincy area. I think it's called Nut Island. If I'm wrong, someone please correct me. From what I've been told, there's a dock there that you can fish off of. Having a boat will get you away from any possible crowd.

There are literally dozens of spots to fish along the Rhode Island coast. Pay attention to the forum for details and directions. Just remember, they're talked about, and you can expect crowds at any of the places talked about. I've been fortunate to have a commercial dock that only employees and their family members can use. This has also been my downfall. There are times when everyone else is catching squid, and they stay away from the dock I'm on!!!

One final spot to mention is Chatham (Cape Cod). I've never fished for squid there, but the spot I've been told about, is a small bridge by the Chatham lighthouse. If you pass the lighthouse (on your right) continue down that road, and I believe the road forks to the right - GO RIGHT! From what I've been told, it's fairly quiet, and anyone in attendance is friendly.

OK, squid and structure -

Squid may seek out shelter like any marine animal, but my limited experience has shown that when they're spawning, they're in shallow water, and couldn't care any less about structure. The only thing on their mind is food and mating! Since they don't live long, they come into shallow water to mate, and head back to the deep holes off of Cape Cod and Rhode Island where they become food for Stripers, Bluefish, whales, and ANYTHING else that can fit them in their mouths!

I hope that answered a few of your questions.

Tight lines!

T.W.

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#2 ru 12 mug

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 04:04 PM

people up in north queensland use a light attached to a car tyre tube that is inflated and just sit on the water next to the boat and works fine.
ru 12 mug
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make squid your friend...then bag them

#3 eatfish

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 05:55 AM

I use fixed lights on the boat. Seems to work fine. On the dock, same idea, usually a fixed Halogen light. I recently read an old post about using Tuna oil to attract squid. Same idea as chumming. Draws in the bait and the Target species follows. Any thoughts? Anyone tried anything close?
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#4 1tym

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 01:40 PM

I use fixed lights on the boat. Seems to work fine. On the dock, same idea, usually a fixed Halogen light. I recently read an old post about using Tuna oil to attract squid. Same idea as chumming. Draws in the bait and the Target species follows. Any thoughts? Anyone tried anything close?



Tuna carcasses draw ALOT of things when I was using them in the down under.. haven't tried up here (havent caught a tuna here) .. but i have chummed for squid here.. it certainly draws the sqquid in but doesn't get them to bite the jigs... they get interested in the chum. from what i have experienced. I usually do fine jiggin.. didnt notice much of difference using chum.
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#5 monkfish

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 08:54 AM

I was wondering if you could tie a series of glow sticks on a weighted line every foot or so and sink it into the water around where youre jigging for squid? Especially around crowded causways where access to the brightest light is limited.
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#6 TentacleWrestler

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 03:19 AM

I was wondering if you could tie a series of glow sticks on a weighted line every foot or so and sink it into the water around where youre jigging for squid? Especially around crowded causways where access to the brightest light is limited.



Do glow-sticks work? I'm not sure. I've seen people use them for a the past few years. The technique I most often see, is someone cracking them and just throwing them in the water and allowing them to free-float. I don't agree with this practice due to the amount of litter it leaves behind. I still swear by my lantern on low power.

If you're going to be fishing around a crowd, there will already be more than enough light (trust me!)

Tight Lines!

T.W.

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#7 dieter

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 07:15 PM

A high intensity light at least 1 m under water give you a very good fishing result.
I do fishing commercial and use an under water light which increase my fishing result 100%
Able to catch 500 kg/night. see the lamp at http://my.opera.com/...w.dml?id=904969

rgds, dw
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