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Difference Between Calamari And Squid?


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#1 Guest_DaMo_*

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 04:50 PM

:rolleyes: What is the difference between calamari and squid?
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#2 MiSh

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 06:23 PM

calamari is the term name for the group that squid and cuttlefish are in.
so they are really one and the same :rolleyes:
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#3 Guest_Guest_*

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Posted 23 April 2003 - 08:20 AM

Calamari is one type of Squid, they have long wings along their body from head to tail.
Arrow Squid is another, they have short arrow shaped wings at the tail end of their body.
Cuttlefish are different again, more coloured and warty looking :-)
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#4 glen

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Posted 01 May 2003 - 08:15 AM

MIsh. as far as I know, cuttlefish are NOT called calamari and are NOT called squid.

they are related to squid/calamari however and fall within the cephalopod family along with the octopus.

glen :angry: :angry: :(
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#5 Guest_Neil_*

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Posted 13 July 2003 - 04:06 PM

Can cuttlefish be cleaned / cooked / eaten just as normal squid?

Neil
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#6 pw-squid

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Posted 15 July 2003 - 07:53 AM

I've seen quite a few people saying that Cuttlefish are even better tasting than Squid. If I catch one I'll certainly be trying it for taste.
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#7 aok47

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Posted 15 July 2003 - 11:18 AM

In the "Recipes & Cleaning Squid" forum you'll find a number of posts related to cuttlefish :ink

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#8 badluck

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Posted 19 July 2003 - 12:19 PM

:D I caught a cuttle fish yesterday and It tasted very nice. I cooked it the same as squid.Cleaning was a bit of messy affair with ink every where but I got there.
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#9 Guest_Karl_*

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Posted 20 July 2003 - 05:47 AM

Calamari is the Italian name for squid.
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#10 Guest_Psaras_*

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 10:23 PM

Just a short note to let everyone know that Calamari is Greek for squid.

Regards

Psaras

P.S Psaras is Greek for Fisherman
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#11 Jazman

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 09:41 AM

I think that the Greek calamari and our Southern Calamari are the same/very similar species. I have a greek cookbook at home, and all the pictures of squid look identical to the calamari I catch here in Melbourne.
Can anyone who has fished for squid in both Greece and Australia shed some light on this?

Cheers
Jazman
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#12 aok47

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Posted 01 August 2003 - 09:32 AM

Hi Jazman,

I haven't fished for calamari/squid in greece but whenever i go for a holiday i always make a point of visiting the main fish-market :angry:

Now greeks have 3 different words for calamari, squid and cuttlefish:

calamari = calamari
squid = thrapsalo
cuttlefish = soopia

our southern calamari is identical to what they call "calamari", our arrow squid is identical to what they call "thrapsalo", and our cuttlefish is identical to what they call "soopia"

so there you go :blink:

the tastes are no different to the equivalent species in australia however one trick they sometimes use in the fishmarkets there is to immerse squid/calamari in very salty solution to preserve it so it doesnt go off as quick. so if you end up with a really salty bit of cooked squid/calamari on your plate and you havent added salt yourself there is a good chance they have done this "dodge". never come across it here in australia, yet.

AK

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#13 Jazman

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Posted 01 August 2003 - 02:53 PM

Thanks AK, you are a champ!
Cheers for your very detailed response, you have totally cleared up my question....... I have never been to Greece, but would love to go one day.

I will keep an eye out for dodgy salty squid!

Good luck on the weekend if you get out on the water (and I hope you don't catch too many thrapsalo!)
:angry:
Jazman
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#14 Guest_fizz_*

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Posted 03 September 2003 - 01:36 PM

Some years back Southern Squid was just that - Southern Squid. The calamari bit, which is the Italian plural for squid came into vogue sometime in the 70/80s probably by some wanky restaurant trying to make it sound more exotic, as most Aussies at that time used to recoil in horror at the thought that anyone would actually eat 'the bait'. So in effect what we are now calling it, is Southern Squids Squid which I find a bit ridiculous to say the least.
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#15 Guest_julian_*

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 05:41 PM

This is a question I'm trying to resolve. At the market in Melbourne, Calamari is between $10 and $20 a kilo ans is identified as having long fins the whole length of the cone. Some have grey markings and some have pinkish markings. 'Squid' usually Arrow or is it Aero squid has short arrow tip like fins at the end of the cones. These sell for a couple of dollars a kilo. Cuttle fish is something different again.

I have done several taste A -B tests on fresh samples. The texture is identical but the taste is quite different. What is sold as calamari has a delicious sweet taste whereas the 'squid' is bland (tripe like). The calamari is easily worth the difference if you want something special - gets my money every time.
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#16 Guest_Guest_*

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Posted 09 March 2004 - 02:42 PM

:th Squid becomes calamari when it is cut into tubes and cooked.
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#17 Mr_Willy

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Posted 16 March 2004 - 01:04 PM

Cuttlefish are much harder to clean and have a sweeter taste than calamari, i prefer calamari..........
Cuttlefish will also feel bigger than they appear as they fill themselves up with water, and can push the water out, otherwise they will hold it and become very very heavy, then the captor will cop it once they are on the jetty.........
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#18 Guest_Uncle Fun_*

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Posted 30 March 2004 - 06:52 AM

It comes out of boat,a dn into the kitchen as squid, it comes out of the kitchen, and on to your table as calamari. Calamari sounds much more exotic, and apealing on the menu than "SQUID" :D
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#19 Guest_antonella_*

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 02:08 PM

Calamari is the Italian name for squid.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


when has a man ever cooked squid or calamari to discover the difference in cooking and tasting :o
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#20 scifly

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Posted 08 January 2007 - 09:32 AM

This tends to be the problem with common names. No, the squid called calamari in Australia are not the same species as the squid in the Northern Hemisphere. Yes, they are very similar and probably in the same family. Basically squid come in 2 broad categories: the inshore or neritic species that form spawning aggregations and lay eggs on the bottom of the ocean (these are the typical broadfin calamari type); secondly you get the ocean squid that often do large scale migrations and are more of a deepwater species (these are the smaller finned arrow squid type). Cuttlefish are different again in that their "backbone" is much larger than in squid and consists of quite calcified material (used often in bird cages). Octopus are different again as are nautilus. The difference in market price may be due to the calamari being jig caught and the arrow squid being trawled. Generally, jig-caught squid is of a higher quality with less physical damage than trawl caught. Additionally unless trawls are of short duration and squid targeted, the squid can become squashed in the bottom of the codend of the net. Hope this clarifies some issues
Len
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