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Lighting For Squid


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#1 TentacleWrestler

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 02:52 PM

I was introduced to "squidding" a couple of years ago, and now, I'm addicted.

Like most forms of fishing, everyone has their own opinion on what works best.

I've gone down to the dock, seen hundreds (if not thousands) of squid, and sometimes, they just don't bite. No matter what color jig or lighting you're using, they want nothing of it. Yet, other times, I've gone to the dock, and you could use a Volkswagen Beetle with a hook, in complete darkness, and they'd bite.

Nevertheless, people have told me not to use my lantern at full power, and others have said; "Get as much light on the water as possible!"

Other than these things (sometimes) being picky, can anyone give me any tips on what they commonly use for lighting?

Tight lines!

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#2 mino_401

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 03:32 AM

I was introduced to "squidding" a couple of years ago, and now, I'm addicted.

Like most forms of fishing, everyone has their own opinion on what works best.

I've gone down to the dock, seen hundreds (if not thousands) of squid, and sometimes, they just don't bite. No matter what color jig or lighting you're using, they want nothing of it. Yet, other times, I've gone to the dock, and you could use a Volkswagen Beetle with a hook, in complete darkness, and they'd bite.

Nevertheless, people have told me not to use my lantern at full power, and others have said; "Get as much light on the water as possible!"

Other than these things (sometimes) being picky, can anyone give me any tips on what they commonly use for lighting?

Tight lines!



lantern lights have always worked for me... this year i'm going to try underwater lighting (green, blue, white)... i've invested about $140 for the 2 sets of lights and another $100 on the portable battery... i'm hoping to try them out this weekend once good news start rolling in... i'll let you know...
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#3 Mr Boston

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 07:10 AM

I was introduced to "squidding" a couple of years ago, and now, I'm addicted.

Like most forms of fishing, everyone has their own opinion on what works best.

I've gone down to the dock, seen hundreds (if not thousands) of squid, and sometimes, they just don't bite. No matter what color jig or lighting you're using, they want nothing of it. Yet, other times, I've gone to the dock, and you could use a Volkswagen Beetle with a hook, in complete darkness, and they'd bite.

Nevertheless, people have told me not to use my lantern at full power, and others have said; "Get as much light on the water as possible!"

Other than these things (sometimes) being picky, can anyone give me any tips on what they commonly use for lighting?



Tight lines!



I too have experienced this and it gets very fustrating not to catch them. This year I'm going to use a tiny squid jig with no weight and see if it works.. I've catch a couple wit this technique last year.
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#4 TentacleWrestler

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 11:00 AM

I too have experienced this and it gets very fustrating not to catch them. This year I'm going to use a tiny squid jig with no weight and see if it works.. I've catch a couple wit this technique last year.


Hey there, Mr. Boston -

The technique that seems to work best for me, is the use of a Yozuri Ultra. I've tried the other squid jigs out there, and if they're not running real "thick", or they're not that hungry, the Ultra seems to sink slow enough to catch their attention, unlike some of the other jigs out there that sink too fast.

I think the only time I've used a weight, is when I use a "snagger" line, or when I "daisy-chain" the Ultras.

Tight Lines!
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#5 usergopats

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Posted 29 April 2008 - 03:19 AM

Hey there, Mr. Boston -

The technique that seems to work best for me, is the use of a Yozuri Ultra. I've tried the other squid jigs out there, and if they're not running real "thick", or they're not that hungry, the Ultra seems to sink slow enough to catch their attention, unlike some of the other jigs out there that sink too fast.

I think the only time I've used a weight, is when I use a "snagger" line, or when I "daisy-chain" the Ultras.

Tight Lines!


In Newport on GI when every one is elbow to elbow if you dont use a sinker you will get snagged on the person next to you , then your trying to untangle while every is pulling them up, that has been my experience there, some where else i dont a sinker or very light one
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#6 Andy

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 04:07 AM

I was introduced to "squidding" a couple of years ago, and now, I'm addicted.

Like most forms of fishing, everyone has their own opinion on what works best.

I've gone down to the dock, seen hundreds (if not thousands) of squid, and sometimes, they just don't bite. No matter what color jig or lighting you're using, they want nothing of it. Yet, other times, I've gone to the dock, and you could use a Volkswagen Beetle with a hook, in complete darkness, and they'd bite.

Nevertheless, people have told me not to use my lantern at full power, and others have said; "Get as much light on the water as possible!"

Other than these things (sometimes) being picky, can anyone give me any tips on what they commonly use for lighting?

Tight lines!


Very interesting topic. Here's some of my own observation based on my recent 2 trips to Newport.

First, when you fish near dock/bridge, there are generally lights around, so we are not fishing in complete darkness. Squid have huge eyes which I believe make them excellent eye-sight, they can see the jigs well in low light condition. What I think the extra light we bring on (latern or flood light) serves more for our human being to see what's swimming down there, plus the extra light attracts shrimps/bait fish (but then how do we know shrimp/bait fish are not there without our light?).

I fished the same spot last Thursday and Friday night where there is public light around, but I cannot make out what's swim down there without the additional latern light. 1st night (Thur) we didn't use the latern because it was drizzling all the time while 2nd night I did light up my latern. 1st night we caught squid from mid-night to 3-4am without extra light, a pretty consistent bite for 5 people. 2nd night squid started biting 8:20pm and I lighted up my latern around 9pm while the bite only lasted until 9:40pm. My latern was on till mid-night but I only caught 3 squid after 9:40pm. The only advantage that the latern provided was that I could see the whole school when they appeared (or turned red) and got my heart pounded.

Now the other topic is sometimes squid bite and sometimes they don't. Thursday night experience - I used three 3 inch jigs(not Yo-zuri) and slayed the squid (almost 1 squid per cast) while 4 other people only caught 1 here or there with their bigger Yo-zuri jigs. This went on for about an hour and the complete opposite happened. 2 people (a Vietname guy and his girlfriend) slayed the squid while I caught zero. I could not figure out why, until half-an-hour later I switched to the bigger Yo-zuri jigs and started catching the squid. This shows that the squid was down there all the time, they prefer certain size/color/design jigs from time to time. My 3 inch jigs have 2 lead balls inside (which I believe making some noise when jigging). When I talked to Kevin (tackle shop in Newport), he said the smaller jigs are used when the squid bite is picky, and he carries some really small jigs (only 1 inch I think) that he said is for really picky bite.
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#7 Got Squid?

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 12:05 PM

Very interesting topic. Here's some of my own observation based on my recent 2 trips to Newport.

First, when you fish near dock/bridge, there are generally lights around, so we are not fishing in complete darkness. Squid have huge eyes which I believe make them excellent eye-sight, they can see the jigs well in low light condition. What I think the extra light we bring on (latern or flood light) serves more for our human being to see what's swimming down there, plus the extra light attracts shrimps/bait fish (but then how do we know shrimp/bait fish are not there without our light?).

I fished the same spot last Thursday and Friday night where there is public light around, but I cannot make out what's swim down there without the additional latern light. 1st night (Thur) we didn't use the latern because it was drizzling all the time while 2nd night I did light up my latern. 1st night we caught squid from mid-night to 3-4am without extra light, a pretty consistent bite for 5 people. 2nd night squid started biting 8:20pm and I lighted up my latern around 9pm while the bite only lasted until 9:40pm. My latern was on till mid-night but I only caught 3 squid after 9:40pm. The only advantage that the latern provided was that I could see the whole school when they appeared (or turned red) and got my heart pounded.

Now the other topic is sometimes squid bite and sometimes they don't. Thursday night experience - I used three 3 inch jigs(not Yo-zuri) and slayed the squid (almost 1 squid per cast) while 4 other people only caught 1 here or there with their bigger Yo-zuri jigs. This went on for about an hour and the complete opposite happened. 2 people (a Vietname guy and his girlfriend) slayed the squid while I caught zero. I could not figure out why, until half-an-hour later I switched to the bigger Yo-zuri jigs and started catching the squid. This shows that the squid was down there all the time, they prefer certain size/color/design jigs from time to time. My 3 inch jigs have 2 lead balls inside (which I believe making some noise when jigging). When I talked to Kevin (tackle shop in Newport), he said the smaller jigs are used when the squid bite is picky, and he carries some really small jigs (only 1 inch I think) that he said is for really picky bite.

Andy, what bridge were you catching the squid from?


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#8 Volim More

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 01:59 AM

You should check on this products. Croatian firm produce LED lights for squid fishing and traditional night fishing with spear 

 

www.volimmore.com


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