Jump to content

The world's biggest, nicest and most helpful squid fishing community!!




Photo
- - - - -

Salty & lemony squid? Not nice


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 glen

glen

    Squidfish Site Administrator

  • Admin
  • 3,339 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, VIC
  • Interests:Squid fishing! and of course maintaining this website! I have been squid fishing since this website started up about 14 years ago. I hope you enjoy using the chat board!

Posted 25 November 2003 - 01:47 PM

Hi everyone,

I recently received the following email from bob and was hoping someone could assist him:

Message I'm kind of new to this squid thing. On a recent trip to La Paz in Baha I noticed native fishermen catching some fairly large squid. I enquired if they were good to eat and was told they were excellent. How to cook them, just fry.

Well I tried that and they tasted very salty and a bit lemony. Not very good. Can you tell me what this is all about.


Cheers, Glen
  • 0

#2 Jazman

Jazman

    Veteran

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 814 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne and Canberra

Posted 26 November 2003 - 06:30 AM

That's odd, I usually add lemon and salt to my squid anyway! Maybe these Baha squid are genetically modified....... :blink:
Seriously, did you catch these squid yourself bob, or did you buy them? I've been told that unscrupulous fishmongers sometimes salt their squid to increase their shelf life. This might explain the saltiness, no idea about the lemony taste (probably a different species of squid to our southern calamari I guess). Do you know if the squid were Humboldt squid? This species is caught around Baha, and grows huge.
Jaz
  • 0

#3 Guest_Robert R. Glenn_*

Guest_Robert R. Glenn_*
  • Guests

Posted 27 November 2003 - 02:14 AM

Jaz, thanks for the reply. I caught the squid off La Paz at a place where several native fishermen were fishing for them. I believe it is a Humbolt Squid. It was about 4 feet long. We were using them for bait to catch Pargo but I saved a fairly large piece of the mantel for the table. Every one seemed to think they were really good table fare and it sure looked good to me.
  • 0

#4 Guest_Robert Glenn_*

Guest_Robert Glenn_*
  • Guests

Posted 29 November 2003 - 02:14 AM

Come on guys, help me out here. I hate to waste this stuff.

Bob :rolleyes:
  • 0

#5 Guest_robert_*

Guest_robert_*
  • Guests

Posted 04 June 2004 - 02:05 AM

Bob,


I have tried to cook the same squid you are talking about twice. Both times it was not good in my opinion. Very salty with an amonia smell and taste.

The first time it was squid that a freind gave me from San Carlos mex. and I blamed him for not cleaning it properly.

The second time was squid that I caught, cleaned, and put on ice in a manner of minutes. I might sound crazy but, it burned my hands alittle as I cleanned it. I thought that was very strange. Kind of like jelly fish. I even soaked it in water and a little baking soda over night before I fryed it. Still that amonia smell and flavor? I am in the same boat as you, I have more in my frezzer and don't want to waste it but I think it is bait now.

I have eaten squid in Loreto Mex. that was just grilled and it was great! I did recently talk to a guy that grew up in Mexico and he said that the big squid is no good no matter how you cook it. So, I don't know. Mybe someone out there can help? All I can do is share your experience.

It is very good for bait!!

Robert
  • 0

#6 Hunter_Killer

Hunter_Killer

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 98 posts

Posted 05 June 2004 - 05:04 PM

Robert fresh squid ought to have a sweet and mild taste. If it doesnt taste like that then the raw material you are using is no good ;)

Edited by glen, 06 June 2004 - 12:43 AM.

  • 0
OWNED.

#7 Guest_Squider_*

Guest_Squider_*
  • Guests

Posted 29 August 2004 - 02:43 AM

:( The Humbolt squid caught off eastern Baja needs to be cleaned properly before cooking. The first 1/4 inch needs to be taken off the sides or the meat will taste sour.
  • 0

#8 Mr_Willy

Mr_Willy

    Veteran

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 297 posts
  • Location:Murray Bridge
  • Interests:Fishing, cricket, football........

Posted 30 August 2004 - 03:44 PM

Well, i think there is your answer.....
Does anyone have more info on the humbolt squid - ive heard these things are massive..........and can pull like buggery when hooked!!
  • 0
SA - the land of the bigger fish. The fish on the east, measure the least, but if you head west, you'll be bringing in the best!!

#9 Guest_Guest_*

Guest_Guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 16 September 2004 - 10:09 AM

Do you guys know that this squid is sold canned? I came across it in a discount store for about two bucks a can. No all that flavorul in itself, so you have to add a sauce. But I would imagine that if its fresh & has an "off" taste or aroma, soak it in milk/ & or par boil it, let it cool & then use. Good luck
  • 0

#10 calamari

calamari

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 23 December 2009 - 05:30 AM

reviving old thread......boil it first b4 u start cooking it....it seems to help eliminate the saltiness and ammonia.....
  • 0

#11 glen

glen

    Squidfish Site Administrator

  • Admin
  • 3,339 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne, VIC
  • Interests:Squid fishing! and of course maintaining this website! I have been squid fishing since this website started up about 14 years ago. I hope you enjoy using the chat board!

Posted 23 December 2009 - 12:34 PM

thanks for the tip! :th
  • 0

#12 Lambo Gini

Lambo Gini

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 24 December 2009 - 07:53 AM

Ammonium Chloride in Squid

Some of the larger species of squid (e g, Humbolt squid) have evolved an unusual way of adjusting their buoyancy (so they don't sink or float uncontrollably). Instead of having a gas (or oil) filled bladder as most fish do, their tissues store ammonia (biological waste byproduct) in the form of ammonium chloride (lighter than water) for floatation. For some, eating these squids has been described as being like sucking on a bottle of ammoniated floor cleaner (only without the smell).

Just Google "humbolt squid ammonium chloride" and you will find no shortage of references.

The Hokkaido Central Fisheries Experiment Station (Japan) had devised a process procedure to make use of this otherwise wasted potential food product. 90% of the bad taste is removed by (as far as I understand) salting the squid for 3 days at ice temperature; followed by 8 hours under running water; followed be 16 hours soaking in still water.

Whether that is worthwhile for you is another matter. For the inquisitive ones to check into further, see

besecondtonone.blogspot.com/2009/12/result3-example-of-processed-squid.html

BTW, because ammonium chloride's salty and sour taste, in the Nordic countries (Finland in particular) it is actually used to flavor candy, cola, vodka, and even ice cream!

So now you know.
  • 0





Similar Topics Collapse

  Topic Forum Started By Stats Last Post Info

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Fishing Links